Category: Breastfeeding


Introducing Solids To Kamea

March 14th, 2011 by

I’m very excited and proud that I exclusively breastfed Kamea for so long. Over 8 months. But, the time has come and it feels right (last time I wrote about timing and introducing solids here). My little baby isn’t so little anymore. She cut her first tooth at 8 months, she started crawling at the same time. She’s big time! I’m a tad sad… lol… but excited, too. Geez, if I’m this way because she’s tasting solids, how will I be when she goes to college?

Kamea tinkering… aren’t her feet so cute?!

Kamea is a little over 8 1/2 months now. For the past week or so, I’ve been introducing tastes to her. For example, when I’m eating an organic apple or pear, I let her lick it after each of my bites. She really likes that! I made a green juice with mostly cucumber, some celery, and a bit of swiss chard… I gave her a little tiny spoonful of it. Some made it into her mouth and some went on her shirt. Oh yeah… put a bib on me, mom! ;) But, I wouldn’t consider those examples to be eating solids. After all, her poop didn’t change.

Then, I tried to officially introduce her to smashed organic banana with breastmilk. We decided to use our new high chair (I scored a great deal on it at MamaBargains.com) – more on that below. We used her little wooden bowl and spoon. We took the camera out. I thought this would be a big day!

Greg putting the high chair together.

Voila! Sleek high chair begging to be used!

Ready for solids!

Organic banana and breastmilk mashed together.

Let me check that out, Mama.

But, the introduction was just that. An introduction. She wasn’t crazy about it and I don’t think much made its way into her tummy. No biggie… it’s only an introduction after all. It’s an opportunity for her to smell, feel, taste, and see different foods that she now has access to. I also let her taste a mild green smoothie of mine a couple of days after that. She seemed to like the one taste, but didn’t want more.

Since she was excited about licking apples, I decided to blend apple and breastmilk together. Again though, not much interest. You know, they say it can take introducing a food up to 15 times before you know if a baby (or child) likes it or not. So, don’t give up!

Another day went by and I went back to mashing up a banana (no breastmilk) and what do you know? She had about 3 small bites. Whoo hoo!

A couple of days after that, I went back to blending apple with a little water and she ate a decent amount. Greg and I took turns feeding her. Then, it was official. Her poop changed! It would seem that she actually ate more of the apple sauce than wore it. :)

Bib? Check! Food? Check! High Chair? Next time…

Yesterday, I also blended up some soaked organic prunes with water and she wasn’t offended by the taste, but she wasn’t interested. I don’t think any of it made its way to her tummy, although her poop would make me think differently.

Deets on the high chair… The funny thing is that I’ve only had her in the high chair once. We do like it, especially the travel booster seat we can easily take to restaurants (we used it last week when we went to Cave Creek). It’s a Minui Handy Sitt. Contemporary looking, made of wood, and can be used for a long time. What I am finding, though, is that I’m just sitting on the floor with her and seeing if she wants to try something I made for her. Speaking of which, I’m making her food using my Travel Blender and it’s been great! So easy to clean and use. Anyway, back to the high chair. I should probably get in the habit of putting her in it to feed her. I’ll start doing that. ;)

I’ve been asked multiple times about our co-sleeping arrangement. I’ll blog about that next time!

So, what are your stories of introducing your little one to solids? Any great tips, tricks, or advice?

Introducing Solids to Babies… Not Yet For Kamea But Getting Ready

January 10th, 2011 by

Sorry for my lack of posts the past couple of weeks. Between Kamea, taking care of household duties, and maintaining my Kristen’s Raw blog… time sure does fly, eh? Kamea turned 6 months of age at the end of December 2010 – yowza! It’s so exciting to watch her grow and see her little personality coming out. It’s been a non-stop blast with her.

Traditionally, this is the time that many parents are excited to try giving their baby solids to eat. But, we haven’t followed that tradition. She’s about 6.5 months now and I don’t feel the need to introduce solids yet. I’ve read a number of sources that state a mom can breastfeed her baby exclusively for up to a year. While that is not my goal or intention, I do feel a strong pull in the direction to go beyond the conventional 6-month mark of exclusive breastfeeding.

There are a few markers that many parents look for before introducing solids:

1) Teeth – Kamea doesn’t have any teeth yet. However, some babies don’t start teething until close to a year old. This doesn’t mean you don’t introduce solids before that, but some people use it as one indicator (of a few) as to the readiness of baby to have solids.

2) Sitting up unassisted and having solid head control – Kamea started sitting unassisted just before she turned 6 months. She’s had solid head control for awhile.

3) Interest in foods – Many babies show their eagerness towards solids by reaching for mama’s food. Kamea hasn’t really done this. She definitely eyes us when we’re eating, but she doesn’t grab for it specifically. She pretty much grabs for everything within reach, so her reach for my smoothie cup doesn’t tell me she’s trying to reach for it to drink it.

4) Hunger – If a baby seems hungry beyond the normal feedings of breastmilk then it could be a sign of readiness for solids.

Most importantly though, I’m simply following my own mama intuition. I didn’t feel solids were necessary at the exact 6-month point, and I still don’t at her current age of 6 1/2 months. As many of you know, Kamea sees two different pediatricians (an allopathic doctor and a naturopathic doctor – read more about that here). Both doctors encourage feeding at 6 months. The allopath said that it helps with development. I wasn’t entirely sure if that was something to be concerned about so I’ve been researching it and here is something to consider from KellyMom.com

I’ve not been able to find any research data to support the idea that there is a limited window of opportunity for introducing solids in normally developing, healthy children. There does appear to be some limited evidence that babies who have been tube-fed long-term or have serious developmental delays may have problems learning to eat if they don’t get a chance to practice eating solids between 6 & 10 months. A small study involving case studies of several mentally retarded children was done back in 1964 (Illingworth RS, Lister J. The critical or sensitive period, with special reference to certain feeding problems in infants and children. J Pediatr 1964;65(6) part 1:839-48.). This study suggested that there may be a “critical and/or sensitive” period for introducing chewable textures to these children, and if solids are not introduced during this time, an important developmental milestone may be missed (possibly leading to rejection of solids later on). This study is theonly one I’ve found referenced with regard to the “limited window of opportunity” claims regarding the normal development of children.

I asked a speech & language pathologist I know about her experiences with this. She has worked with many young children who have feeding problems, including developmental delays and problems with chewing and oral texture aversion. She said that she could not think of any reason that delaying solids would cause feeding problems, and said that the the problems in the children she had worked with had generally started at birth or relatively soon after. None of these children had a feeding problem caused by a delayed start to solid foods.

Kamea’s naturopath is more flexible yet a little concerned with Kamea getting enough iron, but I’m not worried about that. Breastmilk’s iron is highly absorbable and anemia is uncommon in breastfed babies according to KellyMom.com.

That being said, I am thinking about it… for when the time is right. I have prepared by doing research into the foods we’ll be feeding her (I can’t wait to write a baby food book with raw and vegan recipes!). I also bought her an organic bib, a couple of baby wooden bowls and spoons (so cute!), and we dove into researching high chairs. Finding a chair for Kamea has been a back and forth process. I wanted a wooden chair to be eco friendly, but I kept hearing so many mixed reviews about the trendy ones on the market like the Tripp Trapp and Svan. Plus, this video freaked me out in spite of them now including “extenders” with the chairs – you’d think the chair should’ve been designed properly in the first place). The other wood chairs on the market just don’t have enough good reviews for me to make the purchase. I don’t really want to have one made because I’m concerned about safety issues. I started searching for a BPA-free plastic option even though I hate the idea of crappy plastic high chairs. As more days came and went, I just couldn’t decide what to do. My dilemma was I wanted wood to be a green mommy, but I didn’t like the options. The result? A friend of ours is giving us her plastic chair. It’s the ultimate in being green as far as reusing and not making a purchase whether wood or plastic. And, while I don’t like the idea of it being plastic, it seems the route to go, for now at least. If the tray isn’t BPA-free, then perhaps I can find a liner for it or something.

I think Kamea’s first food will be organic banana mashed with breastmilk. We’re taking it day by day although I suspect we’ll venture into solids territory somewhere between 7-9 months. Furthermore, our naturopath said to not introduce cereals or grains until at least 9 months of age because a baby lacks the proper enzymes to digest them properly before that. Whoa! Why don’t more people know that?! So often people start with cereals as the first food.

UPDATE (1/11/11): I just read in Shazzie’s book, Evie’s Kitchen (one of my faves for raising healthy kids!), “According to information in The Breastfeeding Answer Book by Nancy Mahrbacher and Julie Stock, delaying the introduction of food from six months to seven months increases nutrient absorption by 60% for life.”

What are your first baby solid stories and/or advice?

Introducing Solids to Kamea… Not Yet But Getting Ready

January 10th, 2011 by

Sorry for my lack of posts the past couple of weeks. Between Kamea, taking care of household duties, and maintaining my Kristen’s Raw blog… time sure does fly, eh? Kamea turned 6 months of age at the end of December 2010 – yowza! It’s so exciting to watch her grow and see her little personality coming out. It’s been a non-stop blast with her.

Traditionally, this is the time that many parents are excited to try giving their baby solids to eat. But, we haven’t followed that tradition. She’s about 6.5 months now and I don’t feel the need to introduce solids yet. I’ve read a number of sources that state a mom can breastfeed her baby exclusively for up to a year. While that is not my goal or intention, I do feel a strong pull in the direction to go beyond the conventional 6-month mark of exclusive breastfeeding.

There are a few markers that many parents look for before introducing solids:

1) Teeth – Kamea doesn’t have any teeth yet. However, some babies don’t start teething until close to a year old. This doesn’t mean you don’t introduce solids before that, but some people use it as one indicator (of a few) as to the readiness of baby to have solids.

2) Sitting up unassisted and having solid head control – Kamea started sitting unassisted just before she turned 6 months. She’s had solid head control for awhile.

3) Interest in foods – Many babies show their eagerness towards solids by reaching for mama’s food. Kamea hasn’t really done this. She definitely eyes us when we’re eating, but she doesn’t grab for it specifically. She pretty much grabs for everything within reach, so her reach for my smoothie cup doesn’t tell me she’s trying to reach for it to drink it.

4) Hunger – If a baby seems hungry beyond the normal feedings of breastmilk then it could be a sign of readiness for solids.

Most importantly though, I’m simply following my own mama intuition. I didn’t feel solids were necessary at the exact 6-month point, and I still don’t at her current age of 6 1/2 months. As many of you know, Kamea sees two different pediatricians (an allopathic doctor and a naturopathic doctor – read more about that here). Both doctors encourage feeding at 6 months. The allopath said that it helps with development. I wasn’t entirely sure if that was something to be concerned about so I’ve been researching it and here is something to consider from KellyMom.com

I’ve not been able to find any research data to support the idea that there is a limited window of opportunity for introducing solids in normally developing, healthy children. There does appear to be some limited evidence that babies who have been tube-fed long-term or have serious developmental delays may have problems learning to eat if they don’t get a chance to practice eating solids between 6 & 10 months. A small study involving case studies of several mentally retarded children was done back in 1964 (Illingworth RS, Lister J. The critical or sensitive period, with special reference to certain feeding problems in infants and children. J Pediatr 1964;65(6) part 1:839-48.). This study suggested that there may be a “critical and/or sensitive” period for introducing chewable textures to these children, and if solids are not introduced during this time, an important developmental milestone may be missed (possibly leading to rejection of solids later on). This study is theonly one I’ve found referenced with regard to the “limited window of opportunity” claims regarding the normal development of children.

I asked a speech & language pathologist I know about her experiences with this. She has worked with many young children who have feeding problems, including developmental delays and problems with chewing and oral texture aversion. She said that she could not think of any reason that delaying solids would cause feeding problems, and said that the the problems in the children she had worked with had generally started at birth or relatively soon after. None of these children had a feeding problem caused by a delayed start to solid foods.

Kamea’s naturopath is more flexible yet a little concerned with Kamea getting enough iron, but I’m not worried about that. Breastmilk’s iron is highly absorbable and anemia is uncommon in breastfed babies according to KellyMom.com.

That being said, I am thinking about it… for when the time is right. I have prepared by doing research into the foods we’ll be feeding her (I can’t wait to write a baby food book with raw and vegan recipes!). I also bought her an organic bib, a couple of baby wooden bowls and spoons (so cute!), and we dove into researching high chairs. Finding a chair for Kamea has been a back and forth process. I wanted a wooden chair to be eco friendly, but I kept hearing so many mixed reviews about the trendy ones on the market like the Tripp Trapp and Svan. Plus, this video freaked me out in spite of them now including “extenders” with the chairs – you’d think the chair should’ve been designed properly in the first place). The other wood chairs on the market just don’t have enough good reviews for me to make the purchase. I don’t really want to have one made because I’m concerned about safety issues. I started searching for a BPA-free plastic option even though I hate the idea of crappy plastic high chairs. As more days came and went, I just couldn’t decide what to do. My dilemma was I wanted wood to be a green mommy, but I didn’t like the options. The result? A friend of ours is giving us her plastic chair. It’s the ultimate in being green as far as reusing and not making a purchase whether wood or plastic. And, while I don’t like the idea of it being plastic, it seems the route to go, for now at least. If the tray isn’t BPA-free, then perhaps I can find a liner for it or something.

I think Kamea’s first food will be organic banana mashed with breastmilk. We’re taking it day by day although I suspect we’ll venture into solids territory somewhere between 7-9 months. Furthermore, our naturopath said to not introduce cereals or grains until at least 9 months of age because a baby lacks the proper enzymes to digest them properly before that. Whoa! Why don’t more people know that?! So often people start with cereals as the first food.

UPDATE (1/11/11): I just read in Shazzie’s book, Evie’s Kitchen (one of my faves for raising healthy kids!), “According to information in The Breastfeeding Answer Book by Nancy Mahrbacher and Julie Stock, delaying the introduction of food from six months to seven months increases nutrient absorption by 60% for life.”

What are your first baby solid stories and/or advice?

9 Breastfeeding Questions Answered (And Then Some…)

December 15th, 2010 by

Breastfeeding is such a magical experience. Truly one of the best I’ll ever have in my life. I cherish each and every time Kamea wants to feed. But. It wasn’t always easy. Those first few weeks were a learning curve compounded by postpartum fatigue, painful nipples at times, anxiety over whether Kamea was feeding enough, and trying to get a great latch. I’m so glad (seriously… soooo glad!) that I kept at it and stuck it out. The reward has been enormous. I remember one time during the beginning where I had nipple pain and was thinking of ways on how to endure another nursing session. Then, a friend of mine via Twitter wrote to me about how there were times she cried while nursing and she squeezed her husband’s hand to get through it, but that it was temporary and would get better – she promised. Now, I don’t want to scare any mamas away with the thought of crying while breastfeeding. I doubt this happens often. I had tenderness in the beginning weeks, but it seemed to go away as quickly as it came. But, you know me… I keep it real on this blog. Breastfeeding had its challenges for me in the beginning. On top of the tenderness, Kamea liked to feed every couple of hours much of the time. This meant very little sleep for me and very little anything else. Who cares I thought? I had a baby! My happiness trumped any breastfeeding discomfort I had. (Besides, side-lying breastfeeding while co-sleeping is a dream come true – in more ways than one.)

Kamea nursing in the side-lying position. Pure joy.

And, as I wrote, it got better. And better. And better. Now, I can’t wait for those moments to connect with my daughter.

Averie with her daughter, Skylar

So. I wanted to share some helpful information for all of the breastfeeding mamas out there. I asked one of my dear friends, Averie*, if she would mind answering a few questions for us. Oops… those “few” questions quickly turned into 9 questions, of which some had multiple questions. Sorry, Averie, my bad. Thank you so much for being a trooper though and answering them all. You rock the lactation house!

Here we go!

1) Everywhere I turn, when looking for details on what I “should and should not eat” while breastfeeding, it seems there is contradictory information (wheat, soy, citrus, garlic, broccoli, kale, beans, avocado, pineapple, etc – to name a few that I found mixed reviews about.). At the end of the day, it looks like the only things that are safe to eat are cucumbers, apples, and bananas. I’m exaggerating, but you get my point. When I was first starting out, I would google a food to see if it was safe for breastfeeding and I could usually find a site saying it was not a good idea or it could cause problems with baby’s digestion. (Let’s ignore caffeine, alcohol, etc – I know those are bad.) So, in your opinion, is there a list of true no-no’s that a mama should avoid eating while breastfeeding? And, does this change over time? For example, if I avoided chocolate or beans in the first few months, could I eat them in later months?

There are no foods a mother should absolutely avoid just because she is nursing. Some foods a mother may find may bother her baby such as cruciferous veggies (broccoli, cabbage, kale, etc), but until a mom notices that yes, this food is definitely not agreeing with my baby, eat it and enjoy!??So-called “gassy” foods have no more potential to cause gas in a baby, i.e. beans, broccoli, cabbage, because milk is made from what passes through mother’s blood, not from what passes through her stomach or digestive tract. Again, if you notice an issue with certain foods and your baby, do what you see fit but don’t swear off certain foods just because of what you’re “heard.”

2) Talk to me about colostrum and those first days of breastfeeding before a mama’s milk comes in. Can you allay any fears about baby getting enough when they consume so little in the way of quantity?

See this chartAnd realize that most women produce enough milk. ??Make sure the diaper counts are there, that you are nursing frequently which means at least 8 to 12 times in a 24 hour period (not 6 to 8 times in a 24 hour period) in those early days. ??Make sure the baby is gaining weight (note a slight weight loss of 5-7% is normal), but trust in the biology of our bodies to support our babies from our milk.

3) Do you have some recommended galactagogues for mamas not producing enough milk?

Fenugreek, fenugreek seed, anise/fennel, fennel seed, alfalfa, ginger, oats/oatmeal – common and easy to find almost anywhere.??Also effective and most any health food store or Whole Foods will have these: astragalus, blessed thistle, chasteberry, flaxseed oil, Goat’s Rue, hops, nettles, red raspberry leaf tea.??More Milk Plus Tinctures and Capsules by Motherlove are excellent and contain a balanced blend of herbs.

Note that some of the “nursing teas” on the market contain peppermint or mint which can reduce supply in some women (the opposite effect of what they intended).

4) What do you think about pumping? Should a mama stick to breastfeeding on demand, only from the breast? Or, should a mama pump and freeze some in case of emergency? Is there any truth to nipple confusion if a baby has a bottle and breastmilk from the breast?

In a perfect world, baby would be at breast and a mom wouldn’t have to pump but some women have to return to work, or for whatever their particular situation, the mother needs to pump. I wouldn’t recommend introducing bottles until about 4-6 weeks but after that, most babies will go between breast and bottle.??For babies who won’t take a bottle or will only “drink from the tap,” these babies are not confused, i.e. nipple confusion. ??No, not at all! ??These babies have a preference to nurse directly from mom because nursing is more than just being about eating. It’s about being close to mom, too!

For babies who get used to a bottle and then seem to not want to nurse, again, they are not confused. They develop a flow preference, i.e. some babies prefer the very fast flow of bottles over the slower flow and sucking work it takes to extract milk from the human breast.

Babies are very smart, they are not “confused” in either case. ??For any moms who have need to pump or pumping questions, I cannot say enough wonderful things about this group. ??The archives are magnificent and just like every every health and fitness tip has already been shared on healthy living blogs, every pumping tip, question, concern, and then some has been shared here. ??Join if you’re a pumping mom.

5) If a mama notices that she’s not feeding enough on one side and therefore milk production seems to be decreasing on that side, what can she do to get it back to normal? This happened to me because I traditionally sleep most of the night nursing Kamea with my right breast and not as much from my left.

Nurse on that side first. ??Make the baby really drain that side. And each time baby wants to nurse, start on that side. Really put the demand on that side. If this means pumping that side, too, (or pump both breasts while you’re at it and sitting there anyway), then pump.??Nursing is about putting the demand on the breasts and the supply will follow. Breastmilk production is demand-supply driven, not the other way around. You must put the demand on first, supply will follow.

6) What is best – letting boobs hang out all day (when at home) so there is no bra restricting them? Or do you recommend wearing a bra for constant support?

Whatever is comfortable for mom! Do what is comfortable and if you are wearing a bra, don’t wear underwires in the very early days of nursing and if/when you are transitioning from a soft cotton non-wire bra to an underwire, make sure the wire is not poking your breasts anywhere or it could lead to a plugged duct.??Also make sure your bra at any stage of nursing is not too tight. Overly compressing the breasts could reduce supply in some women and frankly, overly snug and tight bras just aren’t comfortable for most nursing moms.

7) I’ve heard that some babies / toddlers will bite mama while feeding. What can be done about this?

Most babies will bite at some time. It happens. If you have given birth, really, a bite is livable.??Babies bite for all different reasons; teething, sleepy, the flow isn’t fast enough, the baby wants to get a reaction out of mom, the baby is done nursing, etc. Take the baby off breast, end the nursing session for awhile, and try again later.

This page is very helpful. ??Again, it happens, but don’t let the “fear of baby biting” prevent you from nursing. More information here.

8) What tips or tricks do you have for breastfeeding in public?

Just do it! I am fortunate to live in Southern California where nursing in public is extremely common and people don’t even bat an eye. Nursing in public is one of those societal consciousness things, though. The more that women nurse in public, the more other women will see it and nurse as well, and the more that younger women and new moms will see it and nurse too. ??There is nothing to be afraid of. ??This is not sexual. ??This is feeding your child. ??Don’t be afraid to feed your child!

Most states have laws protecting a woman’s right to nurse in public, and employment laws regarding nursing on the job or being given adequate pumping breaks. ??See this chart (and per #4, see the Pumpmoms Group and related archives for any pumping at work questions).

One thing I will mention about nursing in public is that it’s best to NOT wear one of those massive cover-up things that look like mom is wearing a small tent around her, or one of those apron-like contraptions. I won’t use the brand name. That just brings attention like a flashing neon light: “something is going ON underneath that tent/apron. Wonder what it is?! ??Oh, she’s NURSING under there. Oooooh. Let me stare!” (Pardon my interruption, it’s Kristen here, but I agree with Averie on this. I tried one of those “covers” on and Greg looked at me and said I looked like a butcher. If a woman is wearing one of those to be discreet, the opposite is achieved in my opinion.)

Instead, don’t draw unnecessary attention to yourself and just don’t wear one. Casually lift your shirt, latch your baby, and then just pull your shirt down around the top of your baby’s head. ??It will look like you are cradling/holding your sleeping baby, not nursing him.??Practice in front of a mirror at home. Nursing does not have to be a flesh-flashing show. I nursed until my daughter was 3 and many times people would come up to me, right on top of me, and practically ask to hold my baby, because they thought I was just cradling her. Wrong. She was latched and nursing.??You have to practice a bit to make it look easy and not flash the world, but again, practice at home in front of a mirror and then, just go out and do it. Baby needs to eat, mom needs to let baby eat. It just boils down to that basically!

9) Do you have any other thoughts you’d like to share?

Nursing is not necessarily easy, nor “natural,” ??for many women. And, the early days of nursing can be downright rough and you may wonder what you have gotten yourself into! Promise yourself you won’t quit in the middle of the night. Everything is better in the morning. And really, give yourself and your baby at least 4-6 weeks before you quit, if at all possible. Most of the kinks are worked out after 6 weeks and then it truly does become natural and second nature.

Some women say that being pregnant was the most amazing experience of their life. For me, nursing was the most amazing experience. I had to overcome a series of challenges, and in the process learned so much about nursing, which is why, in part, I decided to pursue becoming a CLEC. Nursing is just such a wonderful thing and I hope all women feel this way and try to nurse their baby. The gift you are giving your baby, and yourself, is something you and your baby will cherish forever!

Averie

Averie (Love Veggies And Yoga – her blog) is a Certified Lactation Counselor-Educator (CLEC) through the University of California, San Diego (UCSD)
*The advice and information I provide is not intended to replace that of personal advice or consultation from your doctor, nurse, midwife, pediatrician, lactation consultant or other health care professional. ??Nor is the information I provide going to fit every mother/baby dyad in every circumstance, or for those who are experiencing special or extreme circumstances. Rather, it’s intended to be helpful to a majority of women in the majority of situations, but nothing can replace one-on-one in person advice from a trusted, local medical professional, so consult with one as needed.

My Postpartum Must Haves

August 24th, 2010 by

I wanted to share some of my postpartum must haves. These are things I use all the time these days. This list isn’t all inclusive… for example, I’m not listing diapers, stroller, car seat, and stuff like that. This list is simply to highlight a few things that I find very helpful as a new mommy.

Organic cloth prefolds | Organic cloth wipes | *Organic blankets | Breastfeeding pillow | Baby Bottom Balm | Cloth wipe warmer | Rocker swing | Salt lamp | Foot Stool

*The brand I love is Pixel Organics. I bought mine on Amazon, but I don’t see them there now. I also love this one though (I have the veggie one)

By the way, if you’re interested in the Orbit Bassinet I talk about in the video, here it is.

UPDATE: From one of the comments below… here is another rocker option, eco friendly. (I haven’t tried it.) Thanks, Katie!

What are your postpartum must haves?